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William Loscher, MD

It was the hands-on nature of orthopaedics and potential to heal that attracted Dr. William R. Loscher to the field. “There were so many aspects where the physician could assist a patient in their desire to reach a functional norm,” says Dr. Loscher, who completed an orthopaedics fellowship at the University of Southern California after serving for two years as a naval medical officer in Vietnam. The casualties and deaths he witnessed there, as well as those he continues to see as a result of current U.S. engagements, cause him great concern. “I believe politics, greed and religious beliefs are responsible for the pain and suffering of the human race,” he says. Dr. Loscher thinks that research and a physician/patient partnership are both essential to achieving good outcomes. “I weigh all my decisions, in and out of the operating room, knowing that the results of what I will do change a life, hopefully, for the better,” he says.

The Golden Rule of War -- No Primary Closure

28 x 34 in.

Graphite


Dr. Loscher, who has been focusing seriously on his artwork for about 20 years, created this image of a hand damaged by a high velocity injury. He titled it to serve as a reminder of surgery’s golden rule of war, which advises those treating injured soldiers to wait several days before closing such injuries. This allows the living tissue to be identified and prevents massive infections in prematurely closed wounds.

 

A Medic’s Horrific Memories

28 x 34 in.

Graphite


Dr. William R. Loscher created this rendering of a Navy medic reflecting on horrific memories he has never shared—images of his service and carrying little into battle but “Red Cross” supplies. “The memories are too terrible to put into words,” explains Dr. Loscher of the subject’s pained expressions, “but they continue to haunt the medic years later. He wonders if he did enough and if he could have done more.”

 

Two Heroes

28 x 34 in.

Graphite


Dr. William R. Loscher has been focusing seriously on his artwork for about 20 years. He created this image of two heroes in honor of the wounded warrior who puts his life on the line for his country, and the medic who risks his life for both his country and his fellow wounded warrior.