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Altaf Qadri

Altaf Qadri grew up in Kashmir amid mass uprising against Indian rule and, as a teenager, was once used by members of India’s Border Security Force as a human shield against rebel fire. He was drawn to photojournalism because journalists were afforded more access and protection than ordinary citizens during times of war. His career, however, has brought him into close encounters with death and destruction. “I have seen how grenade splinters can damage a whole body, how a bullet pierces through a bulletproof vest,” he says. Qadri believes that photographs highlighting human suffering can make a difference, but he doesn’t restrict himself to only taking pictures. He recently helped policemen bring two United Nations staff to safety in Kabul, Afghanistan, after their guesthouse was attacked. “I thank God for He always gives me a chance to serve humanity,” Qadri says.

www.altafqadri.com

Untitled 2

18 x 24 in.

Digital Photograph


Men, fully clothed with the exception of their bare feet, exercise on mats laid out in rows before a physiotherapy session at the International Red Cross Committee Orthopaedic Center in Kabul, Afghanistan. In the foreground, a prosthetic leg lies on its side, and on closer inspection one sees that each man has lost a leg to war. “Photography is all about story telling, and I have made it a point to be the voice of the voiceless,” Qadri says.

 

Untitled 3

18 x 24 in.

Digital Photograph


A woman holds a toddler’s hand as he learns to walk, using leg braces. The preventative and curative health system in war torn Afghanistan has collapsed, leading to a sharp increase in the number of children with polio. Vaccinations for the disease have been suspended during the conflict, Qadri says.

 

Untitled 4

18 x 24 in.

Digital Photograph


An elderly man holds a horizontal bar in each arm, bracing himself as he learns to walk with an artificial leg. Though accurate figures are not available, there are an estimated 800,000 people in Afghanistan with mobility impairments, about 40,000 of whom are limb amputees.